Summer Offer: Avail 10% Off on all orders. Use Coupon Code: summer10

Plant Proteins- A Reality?

Whole foods: exploring alternative, plant based sources of proteins

Omitting 3-4 animals and their by-products  from diet does not lead to a protein deficiency.

Scope of protein attainment through a vegan diet evokes high skepticism among many.
Under the light of popular opinion, protein automatically equals meat. However, plant sources (including whole foods)  make for an even rich diet in terms of protein . Provided, they are incorporated effectively, unlike with any distinct diet.

Carbohydrates, fats and proteins are the three essential macronutrients needed by the body.

Proteins are essential to carry out: maintenance and growth of the body, neurotransmission, cell building, fluid management, maintenance of pH level etc.

Moreover,  insufficient intake of proteins leads to depletion of bones, reduction in muscle mass, fatty liver, stunted growth, organ failure, impaired mental health, weak immune system and so on…

Ergo,health concerns over protein deficiency are justified.

Now, let’s see how adequate Protein could be attained through a plant based diet!

Proteins essentially consist of a series of 20 amino acids. 11 of which are non-essential and produced within the body. The rest 9 must be taken from outside sources ie.diet. Plant based whole foods contain all the essential amino acids but some are high in lysine while others are high in methionine.To ensure intake of all the essential amino acids, varied sources of protein must be incorporated in the diet.

Let’s take a look at the goodness of plant protein!

Source: Shutterstock

Tofu

  • contains all 9 essential amino acids making for a complete source of protein
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 11 grams of protein
  • rich in iron, calcium, manganese, phosphorus, magnesium, copper, zinc and vitamin b1.
  • versatile for it takes up the flavour of what it is being cooked with

Nutritional yeast

  • contains all 9 essential amino acids making for a complete source of protein
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 46 grams of protein
  • rich in vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin B3, vitamin B6 and vitamin B12

Lentils

  • packed with plant protein and fibre
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 26 grams of protein
  • comes in various varieties- red, green, yellow, and brown; just to name a few
  • rich in of B vitamins, iron, magnesium, potassium and zinc 

Quinoa

  • contains all 9 essential amino acids making for a complete source of protein
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 4.4 grams of protein
  • rich in fibre, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, copper, iron and folate

Amaranth

  • contains all 9 essential amino acids making for a complete source of protein
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 13 grams of protein
  • rich in fibre, iron, phosphorus and manganese

Chia seeds

  • contains all 9 essential amino acids making for a complete source of protein
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 17 grams of protein
  • packed with omega 3 and fibre
  • rich in potassium, calcium, magnesium and iron

Oats

  • contains most of the essential amino acids
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 16 grams of protein
  • rich in antioxidants, manganese, phosphorus, copper, B vitamins, iron, selenium, magnesium, and zinc

Peanuts

  • rich source of healthy fats
  • cheapest source of protein
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 26 grams of protein
  • rich in manganese, phosphorus, copper, B vitamins, iron, selenium, magnesium, and zinc

Beans

  • packed with fibre
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 21 grams of protein
  • comes in various varieties- kidney beans, garbanzo beans, lima beans black beans etc
  • rich in antioxidants, folate, potassium, magnesium and iron

Hemp seeds

  • packed with fibre
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 32 grams of protein
  • contains healthy fats and essential fatty acids
  • rich in vitamin E, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, magnesium, sulfur, calcium, iron and zinc

Almonds

  • packed with healthy fats
  • each 100 calorie serving yields 21 grams of protein
  • high in fiber
  • rich in magnesium, manganese and vitamin E

Textured Vegetable protein (TVP)

  • Also known as textured soy protein (TSP) /soy meat /soya chunks
  • contains all 9 essential amino acids making for a complete source of protein
  • contains no fat
  • Rich in Vitamin B, phosphorus, folate, iron and magnesium
  • often used as a meat alternative

 A vegan diet opens doors to so many (new)tritious foods we wouldn’t have otherwise even bothered to look at. Which one are you planning  to try out?

Previous Article


Open chat